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Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

4 edition of Kachinas in the Pueblo world found in the catalog.

Kachinas in the Pueblo world

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  • 20 Currently reading

Published by University of New Mexico Press in Albuquerque .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Kachinas.,
  • Pueblo Indians -- Religion.,
  • Pueblo mythology.

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references (p. 175-190) and index.

    Statementedited by Polly Schaafsma.
    ContributionsSchaafsma, Polly.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE99.P9 K33 1994
    The Physical Object
    Paginationix, 200 p. :
    Number of Pages200
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL1424372M
    ISBN 100826314724
    LC Control Number93034920

    Popular in Hopi and Pueblo culture, a kachina is a spirit or personification of a thing in the real world, and can represent anything in the natural world or cosmos, from a revered ancestor to an element, a location, a quality, a natural phenomenon, or a concept. The local pantheon of these spirit beings varies in each community; there may be. Find a huge variety of new & used Kachina dolls books online including bestsellers & rare titles at the best prices. Shop Kachina dolls books at Alibris. With one of the largest book inventories in the world, find the book you are looking for. To help, we provided some of our favorites. Hopi Kachinas: The Complete Barton Wright Buy.

    Kachina Dolls Southwest Collectible. In the cosmological world of the Southwest's Puebloan traditions, the masked figures called "kachinas," or "katsinam," personify supernatural beings who live in neighboring sacred landscapes, serving as wise and benevolent . The local pantheon of kachinas varies from pueblo community to community. A kachina can represent anything in the natural world or cosmos, from a revered ancestor to an element, a location, a quality, a natural phenomenon, or a concept; there may be kachinas for the sun, stars, thunderstorms, wind, corn, insects, as well as many other concepts.

    Hopi Kachinas. Hopi kachinas have been lost in legend. The traditions and folklore were handed down by word of mouth as far of what is known, Kachina Dolls have been a big part of the Hopi people and culture for centuries. Their role remains the same but their manifestation changes while the Kachina become ever more beautiful. A kachina (/ k ə ˈ tʃ iː n ə /; also katchina, katcina, or katsina; Hopi: katsina [kaˈtsʲina], plural katsinim [kaˈtsʲinim]) is a spirit being in the religious beliefs of the Pueblo peoples, Native American cultures located in the south-western part of the United States. In the Pueblo cultures, kachina rites are practiced by the Hopi, Zuni, Hopi-Tewa, and certain Keresan tribes, as.


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Kachinas in the Pueblo world Download PDF EPUB FB2

Examines the role of kachinas (rain deities) in the cultures of the Rio Grande, Zuni, and Hopi pueblos. Considers the origins of the Kachinas in the Pueblo world book cult, traces the figure of the kachina to a Mesoamerican original, and looks at the fortunes of the rain deities after the Spanish and Anglo conquests of the Pueblo by: Get this from a library.

Kachinas in the Pueblo world. [Polly Schaafsma;] -- "The Kachina, or rain deity, stands at the center of the Pueblo Indian religious experience. In the Pueblo belief, the kachina is responsible for the tribe's very survival, for without his. Kachinas in the Pueblo World Hardcover – May 1, by Polly Schaafsma (Editor) out of 5 stars 4 ratings.

See all 6 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions. Price New from Used from Hardcover "Please retry" $ $ $ Paperback "Please retry" /5(4).

In the Pueblo belief, the kachina is responsible for the tribe\'s very survival, for without his intervention the crops will not grow, the cisterns will not be filled, the rivers will not flow.\/span>\"@ en\/a> ; \u00A0\u00A0\u00A0\n schema:description\/a> \" In Kachinas in the Pueblo World, fourteen noted scholars, among them Fred Eggan, J.J.

Buy a cheap copy of Kachinas in the Pueblo World book. According to the Pueblo Indians the spirits of he dead return to this world as Kachinas, where they take on cloud form-become cloud people-and bring the Free shipping over $ Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

Kachinas In The Pueblo World by Polly Schaafsma,University of Pages: Kachinas in the Pueblo world / edited by Polly Scchaafsma.

Format Book Edition 1st ed. Published Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, c Description ix, p., [22] p. of plates: ill. (some col.) ; 27 cm. Other contributors Schaafsma, Polly.

Notes Includes bibliographical references and index. In Kachinas in the Pueblo World, fourteen scholars examine the role of kachinas in the cultures of the Rio Grande, Zuni, and Hopi pueblos.

They examine the origins of the kachina cult, trace the figure of the kachina to a Mesoamerican original, and look at the fortunes of the rain deities after the Spanish and subsequent Anglo conquests of the. A spirit being in western Puebloan religious beliefs, Kachinas are a central theme within a number of cultures including the Hopi and the Tewa Village on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona; and the Zuni, Acoma and Laguna Pueblos in New called katchina, katcina, or Katsina, these spirits, or personifications of things in the natural world, may represent anything from rain to crops, to.

Drawings from an anthropology book of Kachina dolls (tihu-tui) representing kachinas, or spirits, made by the native Pueblo people of the Southwestern U.S. Masked individuals represent their return to the land of the living from time to time in Kachina dances, beginning with the Soyaluna ceremony in December and ending with the Niman or.

Kachina, in traditional religions of the Pueblo Indians of North America, any of more than divine and ancestral spirit beings who interact with humans. Each Pueblo culture has distinct forms and variations of kachinas. Kachinas are believed to reside with the tribe for half of each year.

They. Origin of Kachina Spirits To understand Kachinas, one must first understand their origin. Although stories vary, the accepted idea is that at one time the Kachinas lived with the Hopi people but due to some catastrophe, the Kachinas had to return to the Spirit World, where they now live.

To File Size: KB. Rock art depictions of the shalako kachina can be dated back to the 14th century but its recent history is more complex. In her book Kachinas In The Pueblo World Polly Schaafsma described the loss of much of the Kachina cult at Hopi. First through the efforts of the Spanish after their conquest of the southwest to eradicate native religions and supplant them with : Peter Faris.

Pueblo Indians believed that these spirits once lived among the people, but they became offended when not enough attention was paid to them.

Before leaving the Kachinas taught their people to dance. Pueblo held religious festivals and ceremonies in which they asked the Kachinas to.

Kachina dolls are representations of benevolent spirit beings who live among the Hopi for a six-month period each year. They first arrive on the Hopi mesas in February and return to their spiritual homes in July.

Kachina tradition is unique only to the Pueblo Tribes of Arizona and New Mexico. When the Kachinas return to the spirit world at the end of the planting, they return with prayers of the Hopi that we might all continue on this earth for another round in the circle of life.

There are more than different Kachinas, each with its own separate attributes, representing everything from animals to abstract concepts. Hopi Book Kachina Corn Dancer, c Kachinas in the Pueblo World Kachinas of the Zuni Southwestern Indian Ceremonials Antique Hopi Kachina Dolls.

Hopi and Zuni kachinas are a traditional gift presented to young girls to teach them child rearing and the meaning of the kachinas. Young men are initiated into the Kachina cult early in life. Kachina Types. Individual Kachinas. He does many things in reverse because the world of the dead is the reverse of this world.

He may come down a ladder backwards, or perform other actions in reverse. Hututu and/or Sai-astasana – These kachinas originated in the Zuni Pueblo and were adopted by the. Spirits known as kachinas are central to the religion and mythology of the Pueblo Indians of the American Southwest, in particular the Hopi who live in Arizona.

These groups believe that kachinas are divine spirits present in features of the natural world such as clouds, winds, thunder, and rain. Kachinas A spirit being in western Puebloan religious beliefs, Kachinas are a central theme within a number of cultures including the Hopi and the Tewa Village on the Hopi Reservation in Arizona; and the Zuni, Acoma and Laguna Pueblos in New Mexico.

Also called katchina, katcina, or katsina, these spirits, or personifications of things in the natural world, may represent anything from rain to. Author: Muth, Marcia, Published: Santa Fe, N.M.: Sunstone Press, Edition: 1st ed.

Language: English ISBN:,  (4) There are a large number of kachinas that appear in pairs in the kachina parade at the Bean Ceremony, and in the so-called mixed kachina dances of the spring nd early summer.

(5) By far the greater number of kachinas appear in corn ceremonies of fifteen to thirty, with six or eight female kachinas (kachin-manas), in one day ceremonies. Kachinas are spirit beings in western Pueblo religious beliefs, often represented through masks and dolls, as shown here.

This snapshot is from a wonderful book by Barton Wright entitled ‘Kachinas: A Hopi Artist's Documentary’, which Adam got for me in a recent trip to New Mexico. I devoured it from cover to cover — and it’s given me a vision for my next art project: an interactive Views: